Browsing: Postal Service

Q. I am 53 years old, and I’ve worked with the U.S. Postal Service as a clerk for 31 years. I am thinking of retiring in one year. Would I be able to keep my health insurance until I’m eligible for Medicare? If I cannot, can I pay for my same policy through the Postal Service even though I am retired from it? How long would I be able to carry forward my same health plan? My main concern is my health insurance — I heard that you can pay an additional fee to keep your health insurance policy via the Postal Service.

Q. I worked for the U.S. Postal Service for one month in 1974 and then left to join the Navy. After serving four years in the Navy, I applied for reinstatement to the Postal Service and was rehired in February 1980 under CSRS. I left the Postal Service in September 1984 and collected my retirement earnings. I was rehired by the Postal Service in November 1986 and placed under FERS. I have bought back my four years of military time. I would like to make a redeposit for the CSRS period of four years and seven months. What terms and/or interest rates…

Q. I worked for the United States Postal Service as a regular employee for nine years and 11 months. I left for the private sector. Do I have any sort of pension with them besides the thrift savings plan? I didn’t get a refund of my retirement contributions when I left.

Q. I’m a 24-year veteran of the Postal Service at the age of 58. Due to a recommended fourth surgery, I am considering resigning from the Postal Service later this year but want to postpone receiving my annuity until I’m 60-years-old (about 17 months from now) so (according to a human resources representative) I can avoid the 5 percent reduction per year as I would have reached the 60/20 retirement plateau. I realize I would not be eligible for the “special supplement,” but my wish is to work in the private sector and delay receiving social security until my mid-60s. My finances are in order to do this. So…

Q. I know that when you receive your check for unused annual leave (assuming you retire in December), it will generally include any scheduled raise slated for the next year. My understanding is that it is caused by the annual leave check covering the rate of pay for the period of time cashed in. So if the amount of annual leave exceeds the amount of leave you are permitted to carry over without losing that leave, for example in the year before your retirement, you take no annual leave and therefore have accumulated 448 hours of leave as of the date of…

Q. I was eligible for the early out offered to Postmasters in 2012 but decided to stay with the Postal Service. I am currently 55 with 27 years of service. My MRA is 57 and I will have 30 years of service.When the early out was offered in 2012, I decided to get an estimate of my annuity from the OPM. My District HR specialist had insisted that unless I was 62, I would get a 5% reduction for every year I retired before I turned 62. I spoke to two or three OPM specialists who told me that was not…

Q. I was born in 1959, so my MRA age is 56 with 30+ years of service. I turn 56 on Oct. 10, 2015 (which is a Saturday) and I will have 31 years with the USPS (FERS). My master file says I’m eligible to retire on Oct. 9. What is the correct date of retirement? I don’t want to retire on that Friday, Oct. 9, only to find out I retired one day too early.

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