Browsing: Service credit

Q. How many years of continuous FERS service do I need with the federal government to be eligible for a retirement benefit? A. It depends on your age. As a FERS employee, you can retire at your minimum retirement age with 30 years of service, 60 with 20 or 62 with 5. (MRAs range from 55 to 57, depending on your birth year.) You can also retire at your MRA with as few as 10 years of service; however, your annuity would be reduced by 5 percent for every year (5/12ths of 1 percent per month) that you were under…

Q. I started at the Transportation Security Administration in May 2018 with a temporary appointment. No retirement deductions were taken from my pay. I was made a permanent employee in October of that year. Can I buy back the temporary time and have it used in the computation of my FERS annuity? A. Unfortunately, no. Nondeduction service performed on or after Jan. 1, 1989, isn’t creditable for either retirement eligibility or computation purposes. Therefore, you can’t make a deposit to get credit for that time.

Q. I was a government employee for several years and didn’t ask for a refund of my retirement contributions when I left. How can I find a record of my employment and if I’m eligible for a deferred annuity? A. Your employment record is stored in the National Personnel Records Center, located in St. Louis, Mo. You’ll find the instructions for getting that information at www.archives.gov/st-louis/civilian-personnel/index.html#. Once you have it, you can complete OPM Form 1496A, Application for Deferred Retirement, available at www.opm.gov/forms/pdf_fill/opm1496a.pdf, and send it to OPM. If you have at least 5 years of creditable service and are at least 62…

Q. In 2005, I resigned from my position as a civil servant and didn’t ask for a refund of my retirement contributions. At the time I was 51 and had 24 years of service. Do I have any options in order to receive a retirement benefit based on my 24 years of service? A. Because you have at least 20 years of service but fewer than 30, you can apply for a deferred annuity at age 60. That annuity will be based on the average of your highest three consecutive years of basic pay and your total years and full…

Q. I am 37 and have been in the Navy 20 years. I have begun the hiring process with the U.S. Border Patrol. I am an E-8. Should I try and buy back my years in military, which should cost about $8,000? Can I defer receipt of military retirement until I retire from the Border Patrol? I am also curious about the amount of buyback. Is it based on my rate of E-8 or on the total amount I made? Due to my billet and frequent deployments, I made twice what the base pay might be. I spent a lot…

Q. I was a summer employee with the Center for Military History in 1979 in Washington, D.C. I do not know how or if I can get credit for that service. I was GS-2, research assistant. How do I go about finding that info?

Q. I did 10 years active duty and just started a job as a GS position and applied to buy back my military time. I was thinking if I bought back the time, I’d only have to work 10 more as a civilian to get to the 20-year mark. My supervisor told me it doesn’t work that way and that buying back my military time was only to get more money in my annuity when I retire. So now I have to do 20 years as a civilian?

Q. I would like to know if the service computation date changes immediately once I begin buying back my time or once I payoff the time? The other question I have is about leave accrual. I know some folks that have begun paying back their deposit and they have had their SCD adjusted plus they also start accumulating leave at the SCD adjustment rate.

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