Browsing: Service credit

Q. I was a government employee for several years and didn’t ask for a refund of my retirement contributions when I left. How can I find a record of my employment and if I’m eligible for a deferred annuity? A. Your employment record is stored in the National Personnel Records Center, located in St. Louis, Mo. You’ll find the instructions for getting that information at www.archives.gov/st-louis/civilian-personnel/index.html#. Once you have it, you can complete OPM Form 1496A, Application for Deferred Retirement, available at www.opm.gov/forms/pdf_fill/opm1496a.pdf, and send it to OPM. If you have at least 5 years of creditable service and are at least 62…

Q. In 2005, I resigned from my position as a civil servant and didn’t ask for a refund of my retirement contributions. At the time I was 51 and had 24 years of service. Do I have any options in order to receive a retirement benefit based on my 24 years of service? A. Because you have at least 20 years of service but fewer than 30, you can apply for a deferred annuity at age 60. That annuity will be based on the average of your highest three consecutive years of basic pay and your total years and full…

Q. I am 37 and have been in the Navy 20 years. I have begun the hiring process with the U.S. Border Patrol. I am an E-8. Should I try and buy back my years in military, which should cost about $8,000? Can I defer receipt of military retirement until I retire from the Border Patrol? I am also curious about the amount of buyback. Is it based on my rate of E-8 or on the total amount I made? Due to my billet and frequent deployments, I made twice what the base pay might be. I spent a lot…

Q. I was a summer employee with the Center for Military History in 1979 in Washington, D.C. I do not know how or if I can get credit for that service. I was GS-2, research assistant. How do I go about finding that info?

Q. I did 10 years active duty and just started a job as a GS position and applied to buy back my military time. I was thinking if I bought back the time, I’d only have to work 10 more as a civilian to get to the 20-year mark. My supervisor told me it doesn’t work that way and that buying back my military time was only to get more money in my annuity when I retire. So now I have to do 20 years as a civilian?

Q. I would like to know if the service computation date changes immediately once I begin buying back my time or once I payoff the time? The other question I have is about leave accrual. I know some folks that have begun paying back their deposit and they have had their SCD adjusted plus they also start accumulating leave at the SCD adjustment rate.

Q. I have around 13 years active Army and three years Army National Guard time total. I was a sergeant when I separated in October 2011 from the Army. I just accepted a position at the U.S. Postal Service. How much will it cost me to buy back my military time, or is it even worth it? Would that mean I now would have 13-16 years with the post office counting toward my retirement? Does buying time back do anything for your new or current pay grade in a federal job? Does it count toward leave accruals?

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