Browsing: Deferred annuity

Q. Is there any benefit to postponing my retirement pension when I turn age 62? I am eligible then, as I will have the minimum five years’ creditable service through the Department of Veterans Affairs and four years’ active-duty Army. I plan to continue working in the private sector as long as possible. I would prefer to keep my government health insurance and life insurance, if possible.

Q. If I resign from the government, am I required to leave my money in the retirement fund to be eligible for a deferred annuity at age 60 (to avoid the age reduction)? I want to transfer my retirement fund to my own securities personal bank. To be eligible for an early out, do you have to be at your minimum retirement age?

Q. I am 56, but only have six years of government service time. Even though I’ve worked for a U.S. government agency for 31 years, only my time with government service counts toward retirement. Would I be allowed to leave the government before my minimum retirement age and take a deferred annuity at age 62? If this is possible, would I be able to keep my medical coverage?

Q. I left federal employment after 20 years of service under the CSRS retirement system at age 45 with about 1,600 hours of sick leave on record. I will be applying for deferred pension at age 62. Is the sick leave balance considered in the retirement calculation? It is my understanding that it is not because I left service early.

The countdown to the end of the year is on. Some federal employees considering retirement may be eligible for either a postponed or deferred annuity. Postponed annuity A postponed annuity is an option for FERS employees who have reached their minimum retirement age and have at least 10 years of creditable service. However, if you retire under the MRA + 10 provision, there’s a hefty financial penalty. If you have fewer than 20 years of service, that penalty is 5 percent for every year (5/12 of 1 percent per month) that you are under age 62. If you have at…

Q. I am hoping to leave service at 59 years old with 25 years of service. I was planning to postpone my annuity start date until I was 60. My understanding is if I postpone and do not defer my annuity, I could resume as if I just left service. I would be entitled to health insurance and my supplement until age 62; if I deferred I would be ineligible for either. I believe the words “postpone” and “defer” are not the same, though are similar in meaning. Do I need to meet my minimum retirement age to qualify for a postponed retirement?

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