Q. I am a civil service employee that was involuntarily retired from the Department of Defense in 1997 due to base closure. I received a VSIP/VERA in the amount of $25,000. At the time I was 47 years old with 23 years plus four years of military time, which was credited toward retirement. Three months later I was hired by the U.S. Postal Service. I have been there for a little more than 19 years now. I am 66 years old now and am considering retirement this year. Will I be allowed to retire with the total years of service or…

Q. I will be turning 60 in December. I have been working steady now for 20 years, and am still working. My health is so bad now I’m in so much pain working. I won’t apply for disability due to the fact that it takes two years, I’m told, to process a claim. I can’t be without income for that long. I want to retire at 60. Can I do that? Will there be a large penalty?

Q. Can you explain the Windfall Elimination Provision as it pertains to those of us that are CSRS? I have heard many different answers, one of which said they can’t fully offset your Social Security. I have 40 quarters from before I became a civil service employee, and in the early years I worked a part-time job. I am 3½ years away from hitting 40 years now. Will I get any Social Security? Can my husband (who is younger than me) draw against my Social Security until he hits his magic age?

Q. I am 53 years old, and I retired from the Navy Reserve in 2008 with 21 years of service (13 active). I have been a GS employee since 2002 and have made a deposit for the active-duty time toward my civilian retirement. I plan to retire from the federal government when I am 56. Will I still be eligible for a military reserve retirement?

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