Browsing: Medicare

Q. I am a retired federal government employee since 2013. I paid into Social Security from 1966 through 1983 when the late President Ronald Reagan took all federal employees out of Social Security and placed us into Medicare. How do Medicare benefits help me? My time to apply is three months from April 2018. Will I be penalized due to receiving a very low Social Security check when I will be getting my Medicare card next year?

Q. I’m not sure I understand the reasoning for federal retirees to not sign up for Medicare Part B? Are you saying that federal retirees who become eligible for Medicare parts A and B don’t sign up for Part B because there is better coverage under FEHB plans at a lower cost? What about deductibles and co-payments?

Q. I am a federal retiree on Medicare parts A and B, and I also have Geha — a standard option that covers parts of my prescription costs. I was thinking about getting Medicare Part D just to be safe. I was told that if I sign up for Medicare Part D, then Geha will drop me. Is this a fact?

Q. I am a retired U.S. Postal Service employee. I work another job full time but maintain my federal Blue Cross Blue Shield coverage. I am now married, effective with the same-sex marriage law. My spouse, who is 70, also works full time and has BCBS through his employment. When he retires, can I add him to my insurance as he does not have any health insurance benefit other than Medicare? What would be the cost? Would/could we both have Medicare and BCBS?

Q. I’m a CSRS retiree and with Kaiser Permanente. I signed up with Medicare and received my card from Social Security saying I’m covered under parts A and B. I just sent in my first check for $345 for September, October and November. Do I still pay Kaiser the $120 a month for health care, or will that monthly withdrawal stop automatically from my retirement check? If not, who do I call to stop this payment?

Q. Reg Jones says there would be a penalty if signing up for Medicare part B was delayed until later years. The first comment after the response says that there would not be any penalty since the FEHB is “creditable coverage.” The confusion is related to the wording of the rule which states that the creditable coverage needs to be under a working spouse or new employer. It seems that a retirees FEHB (although creditable coverage) does not meet this. Anyway I hear people advocate both positions and wish I knew where I could get a definitive answer for sure…

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