Q. Individuals covered under CSRS pay CSRS employee deductions, and are excluded from Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance taxes of Social Security. They may contribute up to the Internal Revenue Service elective deferral limit each year to the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP), but CSRS employees who contribute do not receive any government contribution. There are so many references in Office of Personnel Management materials, congressional papers and Treasury manuals that prohibited those working under this system from paying into Social Security, how can Congress and Social Security turn around and penalize survivors whose spouses paid into Social Security? Why…

Q. I am 37 and have been in the Navy 20 years. I have begun the hiring process with the U.S. Border Patrol. I am an E-8. Should I try and buy back my years in military, which should cost about $8,000? Can I defer receipt of military retirement until I retire from the Border Patrol? I am also curious about the amount of buyback. Is it based on my rate of E-8 or on the total amount I made? Due to my billet and frequent deployments, I made twice what the base pay might be. I spent a lot…

Q. I resigned under FERS at age 52 with 30 years of service. Can I put in at age 56 and 2 months for collecting my retirement? A. If you were born in 1965, you would be entitled to an immediate unreduced annuity when you reach your minimum retirement age, which is age 56 and 2 months. Note: As a deferred annuitant, you wouldn’t be entitled to the special retirement supplement. Reg Jones is away until May 2. Daily posts of previously submitted questions will continue, while newer queries will be answered following his return.

Q. I’m a 62-year-old FERS retiree who is receiving a Social Security benefit. I’m thinking about taking a job in the private sector. How will that affect my Social Security benefit? A. If you are under full retirement age, your Social Security benefit will be reduced by $1 for every $2 in earnings that exceed the annual earnings limit, which is $17,640 in 2019. In the year when you reach your full retirement age, your benefit will be reduce by $1 for every $3 you earn over a different limit, which is $46,920 in 2019. Beginning in the month you…

Q. I’m retired from the government and receiving a Social Security benefit. I’m thinking of taking a job in the private sector. How will that affect my Social Security benefit? A. If you are under full Social Security retirement age, your Social Security benefit will be reduced by $1 for every $2 in earnings from wages or self employment that exceed the annual limit, which is $17,640 in 2019. In the year when you reach your full retirement age, your benefit will be reduced by $1 for every $3 you earn over a different limit, which is $46,920 in 2019.…

Q. I am a retired Civil Service Retirement System employee with 43 years. I never received any Social Security. My husband of 37 years worked and retired. Now he is receiving Social Security. My pension is more that his. Can I apply for his Social Security benefits now that I am 67? A. You can apply for it; however, that spousal Social Security benefit will be impacted by the Government Pension Offset provision of law. The GPO reduces – and sometimes eliminates – the spousal benefit of anyone who is receiving an annuity from a retirement system where he or…

Q. My husband and I were both federal employees and took the Voluntary Early Retirement Authority. The minimum retirement age for both of us is age 56. Will we both be eligible to receive the special retirement supplement at the MRA, or will only one of us receive the supplement at MRA? A. You will both be eligible for the SRS when you reach your MRA. Reg Jones is away until May 2. Daily posts of previously submitted questions will continue, while newer queries will be answered following his return.

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