Browsing: OPM

Q. I resigned from the U.S. Postal Service in 2005 with 490 hours of sick leave. I started working for the Department of Homeland Security in 2013. I have tried to contact the Office of Personnel Management to see if I could get my sick leave back. Is the Post Office different whereas my sick leave can’t be restored?

Q. Why wouldn’t the Office of Personnel Management give you an option to have taxes withheld if a survivor annuity is taxable? What a huge shock to find out that I owe $6,000!

Q. If a voluntary early retirement is something that must be offered, it shouldn’t be called “voluntary.” To me, the term is a misleading contradiction in and of itself. “You can voluntarily retire; but [only] if we (your organization) offer it.” What are your thoughts?

Q. My mom just passed on. She was receiving a disability annuity. When we checked with OPM, we were shocked to find out they had taken all of her retirement contributions and used it for her disability payments. Is this really what happened? A. In all likelihood, yes. Annuity payments to retirees — whether regular or disability — initially come from the contributions employees made to the retirement system while they were working. Only when that money runs out does the government begin making those payments out of the retirement fund. A retiree who worked full time for an entire…

Q. Where are all these early retirement/buyouts happening? I’m definitely not seeing them in my department  at the VA — we haven’t had widespread early retirement/buyout authority since the 1990s!

Q. With the Social Security supplement for FERS employees, I know there is an income limit at which this phases out. Is this income limit based on what you actual earn, or is it taxable income? For example, could I work and earn $20,000 and put that into my 401(k) plan, thus giving me no taxable income for the year, and still get my Social Security supplement up to age 62?

Q. I was a federal retired disabled annuitant from Aug. 14, 2013 until May 31, 2015, when I was hired by the State Department after receiving a kidney transplant six months ago. The human resources department says the 20 months of disability retirement constitutes as a break in service; they have recalculated my previous Service Computation Date of July 17, 2000 to May 4, 2002. I was told by OPM that my disability does not count as a break in service. Is this accurate? If not can you direct me to the Fed Regs to dispute this? 

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